Friday, May 5, 2017

Pacific Crest Trail, Section C, Cabazon to Cajon Pass: Against the Wind, Days 1-4

the mysterious whitewater area
Triscuit and I stood under a harsh Southern California sun. Wind, the equivalent of a blowdryer aimed at the face, whipped around us. Where was the trail? We could see the trail angel house we had stopped at the year before, but the angels had retired and this was clearly off limits. Taking a wild guess, we scrambled up a prickly hillside to find it: the PCT. We were back.
Uphill, always uphill

Triscuit views the trail ahead


Mt, San Jacinto, still snowy

Our goal: Cajon Pass, 132 miles away. Six days? Seven? Since we had started at three in the afternoon, we could only hope to reach Whitewater Preserve, an oasis in this parched landscape of cactus, creosote, and ceanothus. Trudging uphill, burdened by the entire food supply we had planned on taking (no resupply), we made it eight miles: a gurgling river and green grass, populated by a sea of thru hiker tents. Frogs in the desert, how was this possible?



out of the oasis

But this wasn't true desert. Over the next few days, we gradually ascended to nearly 9,000 feet. Our camp on Day 2, after an all day 18 mile grind uphill, though admittedly through a fascinating river landscape, was the result of a rookie mistake on my part. Arriving at the so-called "creekside camp" on my map, I was dismayed to note that it was only a wide spot in the trail, already festooned with tents. At lunchtime we had shared a sitting log with several other hikers and those were sure to follow. While others can sleep with tents right next to them, I am not one of those. I found a small sandy beach by the river and dropped down to it with delight. When Triscuit appeared after a rough day, she was too tired to argue.

During the night, the Santa Ana winds rose to a crescendo. I lay awake as a gritty substance blew in through the exposed mesh of the tent. Sand--I was being buried alive in the sand! After a sleepless night and a morning of panic when I dropped a contact lens on the beach and, amazingly, found it--we marched on twenty more miles, to find a forest of pine trees.

Was this really Southern California, I marveled, as I hurtled myself down switchbacks, near hypothermia? The scenery resembled the Sierra, with a deep forest and huge sand-shaped boulders. Who knew this existed?  The landscape was almost impossible to capture via camera, but it was composed of stark and strange beauty. We walked through burned areas, the bones of the land revealed by wildfire.

The people were a hardy, friendly bunch, far different than last year. We came upon a hiker huddled in a crevice to escape the ceaseless wind. When asked for his trail name, he said sheepishly, "Spooner.", alluding to the fact that some girls had given it to him on another trail. Other hikers weren't as circumspect about prior hiking experience: one man found a way to insert the fact that he had "hiked the AT" twice in a two minute conversation. (He was also carrying a bear canister, hundreds of miles before it was required, claiming he might as well get used to it. Okay, Bear Can Boy.)


Pine trees!

With our dedication to mileage, we outdistanced the hiker bubble we were in and reached a new one, with hikers who had started several weeks ago. At campsites the trail seemed crowded but during the day we mostly walked alone. Alone, but with the wind, a constant companion.

On Day 4, we hit a camping jackpot. It had been 21 miles of descent from the freezing pines into the swelter of the lowlands, and we knew we were coming into a restricted camping area. We had to stop somewhere, and we spied it, a small flat area near some boulders, with a view of trackless mountains. Nobody camped near us, not any of the people we had given our own trail names to and never saw again--the Australians (we had mistook their accents for Aussies), International Girl, Creeper, Tat--nobody was in sight. The wind even stopped breathing.

We were holding our own. Looking at the maps, it looked like an easy, though hot, cruise ahead. Little did we know things were about to get weird. Very, very weird...

To be continued...

14 comments:

  1. From place definitely "off-trail" following your vivid descriptions makes me feel as if I am right there in the pines, the wind, the other hikers. And way to leave us hanging for next installment!

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    1. I have to keep the suspense up!

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  2. It certainly doesn't look like the southern California I'd imagine! Can't wait to hear more about your latest PCT adventures.

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    1. Definitely hard to photograph I thought. So much to see, but hard to convey.

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  3. What is your trail name? I can't remember.

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  4. Great Blog. Waiting for the weirdness, which I am thinking might have something to do with hot water dwellers. Saw you were mentioned on another blog I was reading. I think the trail name on the blog was Birdie. --Keep Smilin'

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    1. Oh Birdie! I'll have to ask you for her blog title. She was great! And you are right about the hot water dwellers. And a persistent trail angel.

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  5. Nice cliffhanger!!! Ah, trail life. I miss it so.

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    1. There's nothing like it, is there? Impossible to describe unless you've been there.

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  6. I so enjoy when you share your adventures along the PCT! I especially like this post, I day hiked in the Whitewater area twice and your first photo looked so familiar. I have one very similar. Looking forward to reading your next story!

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    1. I loved Whitewater! Would be a fun place to hang out for a few days.

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  7. That wind would drive me insane.
    There seems to be a heavy number of hikers, so early on the trail.
    I can't imagine what the weirdness will be.

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    1. Yes, although this is a tough year. I bet less than 10% will finish due to snow.

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