Sunday, May 9, 2021

Following the Snake: four days on the Idaho side

 This post first appeared on http://mountainsskin.blogspot.com. If you are reading it elsewhere, it is stolen content. Go to the original site for more and don't give scrapers clicks.

Where do you go when it's snowy everywhere? You head for the river. Spoiler alert, it can still be cold. But Flash and I were longing for a real trail, and last year our planned trip came right at the moment of a stay at home order. (Note, only a few of us actually followed that order.)

Iconic Hells Canyon shot.

We arrived at Pittsburg Landing in a snowstorm/rain which didn't bode well, but being hardy types, we soldiered on. Out goal the first day was a mere 5.5 miles, to the campsites at Kirkwood Ranch. These are civilized sites, with picnic tables and the cleanest bathrooms I've ever encountered. 

We gazed with dismay on a terrifying sight. There were at least 25 tents and twice that many people huddled against a bitter wind. Kirkwood was a big nope. Hoping the trail would provide, we kept going.

About a half mile later, a small beach appeared. A tent was set up on the far end of an adjoining beach, but we managed to find a small site that blocked the wind. We felt lucky to have found it.

The following morning we rallied early to take on the next section, a rocky climb up to Suicide Point, then a rolling hike across the benches of the canyon, remnants of old ranches rusting in the sun. Most people stop at Kirkwood; besides seeing a raft flotilla across the river, we were alone in a vast landscape.

Yard sale at camp 1. Photo by Flash.

The Sheep Creek ranch was deserted; a caretaker is in residence for much of the season and river trips stop there, but it was obvious that nobody had been there since last summer. The campsites were spectacular though, so we decided to stop for the day.  I wandered up the trail that eventually led to Hells Canyon rim, dreaming of other hikes, other days.

On trail. Photo by Flash.

Our objective the next day was a long day hike to Bernard Creek. It is possible to hike past that point, though you may encounter more poison ivy and some brushy conditions. With light packs, we made it to the cabin by mid-morning. It is in a lovely spot, with a creek and a fine back porch for a snack break. An interpretive panel told us about some of the history of this place. A woman lived here with her husband, and would walk to a spot along the river to meet another woman who lived on the other side. They would holler across the river, trying to have a conversation to combat loneliness. People were tougher back then. 

We arrived back at our campsite to a terrifying sight. A group of music-listening guys were setting up a huge camp near the ranch building. Any hope of a peaceful evening was dashed, so we decided to relocate downriver to one of my favorite campsites of all time. It included a brief but amazing river swim.

Kirkwood was deserted as we passed back through. Tempting as it was, we had long drives the next day, so we defaulted to a motel in Grangeville to break it up. There we ate the most expensive pizza in the universe and contemplated our life choices. I've hiked about 1000 miles with Flash, and after a year of isolation, it was reassuring to be back to normal, even if only for a few days. We had covered fifty miles, but had gone way back in time in the canyon. 






Note: So far I am leaving this blog as is, but some complications have arisen. Not only has content been stolen, but in June the "notify by email" feature is going away. Do you get those notices? I'm trying to gauge how disrupting this will be. 


CHECK OUT MY BOOKS--HTTP//MARYEMERICK.COM

REPORT WEB SCRAPERS!
MAKE GOOD CHOICES!









23 comments:

  1. I love hikes that are historical too!!!! What a lovely couple days for you!

    I personally don’t use the email notifications....I use Bloglovin .com to keep up with the blogs I follow. I am also curious to see how this affects my blog though!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wonder, will people just forget to read? I like when people read my blog. Makes it worth doing.

      Delete
    2. Yes it does make it worthwhile. Luckily for me writing is alan it my catharsis ...so I do get enjoyment from it also!

      Delete
  2. What a beautiful river! Someday I'll get over your way for more exploration.

    I wasn't sure how many people actually use the email widget on my blog so I looked it up. More than I thought, however a bunch of email addresses looked bogus so not sure how many folks would lose out. All these Blogger issues lately have made me seriously think about switching over to Wordpress.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm in the same boat but I lazily don't want to learn a new system or especially how to transfer old posts over.

      Delete
  3. I am having to figure out how to switch the Feedburner email situation, too. Which reminds me, I had put it off. It's a frustrating issue. Sorry you are having to deal with scrapers....and noisy music hikers. I hate that crap.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you figure it out, let me know! I'm putting it off too.

      Delete
    2. Hi Misti and Mary, I know a good Feedburner alternative - follow.it! Please have a look here why we're a great alternative: https://follow.it/blog/feedburner-stops-email-services-switch-to-follow-it-now/. The switching process is very quick and we are always happy to help you :)

      Delete
  4. I do always use the 'notify by email' feature to note when another adventure is there for me to read....and dream about.

    ReplyDelete
  5. How/where do we report web scrapers? Glad we have a name for thus scabs now. I guess everyone nearby decided this was the time to visit Hells Canyon also. So different than my visit. I'm notified of your posts via the email link.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well I thought it would be easy to report, but in this particular case it's not. I think it's typically easier to see the webhost. This site that's stealing, not so much.

      Delete
  6. Such a great hike and so nice to return to a kind of normal in the canyon.

    I use Feedly for all my blogs. It's a news/blog aggregator. I put in the website I want to follow, and it pulls the content for me. So I don't get the email notification. So bummed you are having to go through having your content scraped.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I need to check out Feedly. And I wish we were still in the canyon. Sure it's a bit more snakey though.

      Delete
  7. Glad you were able to get out and enjoy the sun for a few days. I will never understand the loud music out in nature thing.

    I used to use the email notification feature, but now I just check in when I have a chance. If I've commented I check back in a day or two to see if you replied. This is the only blog I currently follow now so I don't have troubles having to remind myself to check for entries.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do the same thing with the blogs I follow. I can't keep up with emails as it is.

      Delete
  8. Great hike and time with your friend. I don't use email notifications at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Me either, I just randomly check blogs I want to read.

      Delete
  9. I am thinking of moving my blog to Wordpress because of the email issue. I had never heard of scrapers before. Interesting. How do you know when your content has been stolen?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I may move mine too but ugh, who has the time? I only found out because by chance I typed the title of a recent blog post into Google. Voila, there it was with no credit to me.

      Delete
  10. I always use the email notification feature, I just don't remember to check even the few blogs I enjoy unless I get a notification.
    SO many people already out there? That's horrifying to me. and loud music? WTF?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it's prime river season and to be fair, the workers setting up the camp had music. Not sure the rafters kept it going.

      Delete
  11. I was diagnosed as HEPATITIS B carrier in 2013 with fibrosis of the
    liver already present. I started on antiviral medications which
    reduced the viral load initially. After a couple of years the virus
    became resistant. I started on HEPATITIS B Herbal treatment from
    ULTIMATE LIFE CLINIC (www.ultimatelifeclinic.com) in March, 2020. Their
    treatment totally reversed the virus. I did another blood test after
    the 6 months long treatment and tested negative to the virus. Amazing
    treatment! This treatment is a breakthrough for all HBV carriers.

    ReplyDelete

Hello out there. If you liked this post, please leave a comment so I keep writing!